The Constitution for the United States of America

Bill of Rights
Preamble

Congress of the United States begun and held at the City of New-York, on Wednesday the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty nine.

The Conventions of a number of the States, having at the time of their adopting the Constitution, expressed a desire, in order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added: And as extending the ground of public confidence in the Government, will best ensure the beneficent ends of its institution.

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, two thirds of both Houses concurring, that the following Articles be proposed to the Legislatures of the several States, as amendments to the Constitution of the United States, all, or any of which Articles, when ratified by three fourths of the said Legislatures, to be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of the said Constitution; viz.

Articles in addition to, and Amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America, proposed by Congress, and ratified by the Legislatures of the several States, pursuant to the fifth Article of the original Constitution.

Most people are not aware of the fact that there is a Preamble to the Bill of Rights. Because the Preamble declares new Provisions are declaratory and restrictive, which, in other writings have been referred to as Mandatory and Prohibitory - meaning that what is said must be followed in the exact manner it was declared and the government is restricted from doing anything outside what is declared. If, when the Bill of Rights is published, the Preamble doesn't show up - how will the People know about it?

Many of the States, at the time they ratified our Original Constitution felt that the restrictions on the Federal Government were not well enough defined and our Individual Rights were not spelled out in enough detail to properly protect them from an aggressive government. Therefore they added the provisions of the Bill of Rights to the Constitution. Even though they are referred to as Amendments, they did not amend anything.

Even though it is not specifically stated because everyone already knew and understood the situation, all of the provisions in our Bill of Rights pertain to our Common Law, and our Common Law Courts. This should be obvious to the reader because the sole and proper venue of all our unalienable rights - our Life, our Liberty, our Freedom, our Property, etc., is the Common Law Court.

Remember, the Federal Government is restricted to Maritime Law and Equity Law. Neither of which deal with individuals, and the rights of the individuals.

Remember also, neither the Federal nor the State Governments have any powers under Common Law. Everything in our Bill of Rights pertains to our Rights and are therefore Common Law Subjects. Our public servants are precluded from doing anything with our Rights and therefore have no ability, power, authority, or anything else, to allow them to mess around with the provisions in our Bill of Rights.

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