The Constitution for the United States of America

Bill of Rights
Article 6

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.

These are all basic Common Law Principles that have been stated by our Founding Fathers in order to assure themselves that these rights are secure.

The fact that the word "accused" is used instead of the civil law term "defendant" shows conclusively that this is all related to Common Law.

All criminal prosecutions are under Common Law, and, of course, the accused has the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial Common Law Jury in the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation, and to be personally confronted by the damaged party at every step along the way, including the Grand Jury procedure. to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of Common Law counsel for his defense.

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