The Constitution for the United States of America

Article 3
Section 1

The judicial power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme court, and in such inferior courts as the Congress may, from time to time, ordain and establish. The judges, both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behaviour, and shall, at stated times, receive for their services a compensation, which shall not be diminished during their continuance in office.

This Paragraph establishes the third branch of our Government.

Each of these Branches was established to have separate powers and authority and they were strictly prohibited from infringing upon the power and authority of the other Branches. These Branches were also created to keep each other in check.

When the Constitution says the Judicial powers are vested in one Supreme Court it is limiting the number of Supreme Courts that can be established under the powers granted by the Constitution.

The Judicial Branch cannot make laws, and it has no power to manage the day to day affairs of the government. The only thing the Judicial Branch can do is to rule on what cases may lawfully come before it.

The judicial power of the governments established by the people begin in our local communities across the country and evolve upward to the Counties, the States, and then to the Federal Government. The basis for the entire judicial system is Common Law which is vested solely in the people, and shall be, and remain, the sole judicial right of the people. The counties, States, and Federal government shall have no rights in, or to, the Common Law. Remuneration for the services of people working for the Common Law Courts shall be determined by the Community in which the Common Law Court is located. Remuneration for the workers at other levels of the Common Law Court System shall be as determined by those who are involved in each level of the court.

Each community shall organize a Superior Common Law Court that shall be convened whenever necessary to handle the needs of the community. Each Community Court shall select at least a Chief Justice, a Recorder, a Bailiff, and such other officers as the community itself determines. The Jury for such Court shall consist of twelve justices, selected from the members of the community, who also function as the judges and shall examine the facts and law concerning the resolution of the case. Other than being at least eighteen years of age and competent to understand the case brought before the Court, there shall be no racial, ethnic, religious, educational, or other restrictions on who may serve as a jury member, or as an officer of the Court. Being an officer, or jurist, for a Common Law Court shall not be construed to be an office of honor or profit created under the provisions of the Constitution, and such officers and jurists shall be eligible for membership in the Legislature or election to any public service office.

Decisions of the Community's Common Law Court may be appealed to the County Common Law Court. The County Common Law Court shall be staffed by a jury that consists of twelve justices, selected from the Chief Justices of the Community Courts. If there are not enough Community Chief Justices then other residents of the County will be selected to seat a jury of twelve jurists. The Chief Justice of the Community Court for the case being heard is not eligible to be one of the jurists. The jury shall examine the facts and the law concerning a resolution of the case. A County Common Law Court may only hear appeals from Community Common Law Courts based within the county.

Decisions of the County's Common Law Court may be appealed to the State Common Law Court. The State Common Law Court shall be staffed by a jury that consists of twelve justices, selected from the Chief Justices of the County Common Law Courts, with the provision that the Chief Justice of the County Common Law Court where the case was heard is not eligible to be a member of the jury. The jury shall examine the facts and the law concerning a resolution of the case. A State Common Law Court may only hear appeals from County Common Law Courts based within the State.

Decisions of the State's Common Law Court may be appealed to the Federal Common Law Court. The Federal Common Law Court shall be staffed by a jury selected from the Chief Justices of the several State Common Law Courts, that consists of twelve justices, selected from Chief Justices of the several States, with the provision that the Chief Justice of the State the appeal comes from shall not be eligible to serve as a member of the jury. Jurists shall examine the facts and law concerning a resolution of the case. The Federal Common Law Court may only hear appeals from State Common Law Courts.

The judicial Power granted to the Federal government under this Constitution, shall be vested in a Supreme Court for the united States of America, and in such inferior Courts as Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The Judges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts, shall hold their Offices during good Behavior, and shall, at stated Times, receive for their Services, a Compensation, which shall not be diminished during their Continuance in Office.

All of the courts established hereby shall be restricted to dealing with problems and concerns over matters pertaining to the specific powers granted to the government by the people. The people, through their Common Law Courts, specifically retain all venue concerning the unalienable rights of the people, which shall include all cases concerning the actions and activities of the people themselves, specifically their Life, their Property, their Liberty, and their Freedom.

Our Founding Fathers, and their compatriots, knew all about Common Law, and how it functioned. They did not bother to explain Common Law in the Original Constitution. Common Law has been maligned and abused by those who would subvert it for their own aggrandizement and greed. It is now necessary to establish a system of Common Law to be used by the People in meeting their judicial needs. Neither the Federal government nor any of the several States has any right to the Common Law - it belongs to the people.

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